Electric Lit Will Offer Scholarships to Catapult’s NYC Writing Workshops

Because improving your writing shouldn’t break the bank

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UPDATE, April 5: Applications are now open for spring and summer classes.

With the support of the New York City Department of Cultural Affairs, Electric Literature is proud to offer 20 partial scholarships to Catapult’s NYC writing workshops for the second year. We are now accepting applications through Catapult’s website, and New York City-based writers of all ages and experience levels are invited to apply. (NOTE: because this is a New York City Depart of Cultural Affairs funded-project, all applicants must reside in New York City to be eligible.) To be considered for a scholarship, select the course you’re most interested and click “take this class.” While viewing the registration form, check “Opt-in for a scholarship.” Shortly after submitting your application, you’ll be prompted via email to submit a writing sample of no more than 2,000 words and a brief statement of need. Scholarships are available for 6 to 8 week writing workshops as well as single-day master classes through July 2018, and applications will be accepted on a rolling basis.

Catapult’s workshops topics relate to the instructor’s unique skill set and literary sensibility, and single-day masterclasses offer students the chance to dive into subjects like narrative voice and story structure. These craft-oriented classes are offered alongside courses designed to help emerging writers navigate the publishing industry. Current instructors include Elissa Bassist, Simon Van Booy and Weike Wang, in addition to professional editors and literary agents.

“Over fifteen hundred emerging writers have taken our classes,” said Julie Buntin, Catapult’s Director of Writing Programs. “They’ve gone on to top-ranked MFA programs, won fellowships and awards, signed with agents, published books. We believe that a strong literary community, one that matches emerging writers with engaged mentors, can change an artist’s life, and we’re so proud to be working with Electric Literature on this scholarship program.”

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