Frightful Weather: A Contest!

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Over 30 of you entered succinct yet terrible weather accounts, making the Shya’s pick, in his words, “tough.”

WINNER: Jim Hanas! Weather: “All night, mysterious creaks of trees splitting. Everyone wakes, stunned, and walks through Memphis, now an icy southern star.”

Runners-up:

“Lightning struck the earth 20 yards from where I stood. It turned my eyelashes white, and my fingernails black.” adamthehousecat

“I was in a plane that dropped 100 feet suddenly. My drink lifted out of my cup, then fell right back in.” MAKARMUSIC

“I woke up one night during a flood to find my bed had made it outside and was out front of 7–11.” giganticanovel

“Stranded at the base of a mountain, snow knee deep, cooking on wood stove, melting snow for water. 3 kids under 6.” cassandraneace

Here we have Shya Scanlon’s debut novel, Forecast: “The year is 2212, the weather is out of control, and Seattle is being rebuilt with electricity generated from negative human emotion. In a strange and turbulent world fueled by secrecy and voyeurism, a bored housewife named Helen vanishes, and Citizen Surveillant Maxwell Point, the man whose job it’s been to watch her, must recount the years leading up to her disappearance.”

How about a FREE COPY? We’ve got one. Along with some sweet Tom Selleck postcards, all from Flatmancrooked. WIN THESE THINGS!

Ways to enter the contest: Write 140 characters about the worst weather you’ve ever weathered:

(1) On twitter, using #weather2212 hashtag

(2) In the comments section below

Winner to be announced by Friday, Dec. 10th.

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Thank You!