Milo Will Sue Simon & Schuster for $10 Million

The alt-right troll will self-publish his memoir under his new Dangerous Books imprint

Milo Yiannopoulos profits from controversy, so it’s not surprising that he has revived the one surrounding his defunct book deal with Simon & Schuster. The alt-right activist slash internet troll announced his plans to sue the publishing house for $10 million dollars in retribution for canceling the deal to publish his memoir Dangerous.

In December, when Yiannopoulos secured a $250,000 advance from Simon & Schuster’s conservative imprint, Threshold Editions, the publisher’s huge advance and tacit approval of Yiannopolous’s hate speech caused an outcry, particularly among the literary community. S&S seemed to put an end to the controversial deal in February, when a tape surfaced of Yiannopolous trivializing pedophilia and questioning the “arbitrary and oppressive” age of consent. Shortly after the tape came to light, the publishing house dropped Yiannopolous, who also resigned from his position as an editor at Brietbart.

Now Yiannopolous is plotting his revenge. Thanks to a claimed 12 million dollar investment from unnamed backers, Yiannopolous has started his own media company, Milo, Inc., which he has described as “a fully tooled-up talent factory and management company dedicated to the destruction of political correctness and the progressive left.” In his official press release, Yiannopolous added that he plans to “make the lives of journalists, professors, politicians, feminists, Black Lives Matter activists, and other professional victims a living hell.”

Add publishing houses to that list. In addition to suing Simon & Schuster to “send them a message,” Yiannopolous is establishing his own press called Dangerous Books to promote titles by authors who “can’t get published.” He will be the debut author. Yiannopolous will self-publish Dangerous this summer and promote it while on his Troll Tour of American colleges.

Which Novelists Are Writing for TV in 2017?

About the Author

More Like This

How Brexit Could Destroy the U.K. Publishing Industry

Proposed immigration policies aren't just xenophobic—they also threaten the country's creative and cultural life

Sep 12 - Holly Barrow

What Writers Need to Know About Morality Clauses

You may not even realize that your book contract could be canceled if you're accused of misconduct—or just cause drama

Jul 30 - Carrie V. Mullins

Being Published in Asia Changed Everything About My Asian American Writer Experience

My book tour made me think about how publishers—and readers—react differently to writers who look like them

May 14 - Winnie M Li