TV Adaptation of Neil Gaiman’s Short Stories to Begin Filming in November

by Melissa Ragsdale

Neil Gaiman fans rejoice — a TV show called Neil Gaiman’s Likely Stories is on its way. This four-part series will be comprised of adaptations of Gaiman’s celebrated fantastical short stories.

Neil Gaimain’s Likely Stories is to be directed by duo Iain Forsyth and Jane Pollard, whose credits include the award-winning feature film 20,000 Days on Earth. The show will be aired on UK satellite channel Sky Arts, and will be produced by Sally Woodward Gentle’s independent production company, Sid Gentle Films. A singular ensemble cast will appear throughout all four parts.

There is no announcement yet as to which stories will be chosen for the show, though there are plenty of options to choose from. Short story collections by Gaiman include his most recent book, Trigger Warning (2015), Fragile Things (2006), Smoke and Mirrors (1998), and Angels and Visitations (1993).

This is by no means the first of Gaiman’s work to be put on screen. Fans have been eagerly anticipating the TV-adaptation of American Gods, which is due to begin filming in March 2016. Novels such as Stardust and Coraline have been adapted into hit movies, and it was just announced that a film-version of his children’s book Fortunately, The Milk is in the works, produced by and starring Johnny Depp. For years, news has been floating around about an upcoming movie based on the Sandman graphic novels. Gaiman has additionally written several episodes of Doctor Who, including the acclaimed episode “The Doctor’s Wife.” His novel Neverwhere was even turned into a radio teleplay by the BBC.

With Gaiman’s active imagination and prolific pen, there are many exciting possibilities for Neil Gaiman’s Likely Stories. To get a taste of what we could expect, read his Hugo Award-winning story “How to Talk To Girls at Parties.”

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