Finfinite Love

Four poems by Brittany Dennison

Finfinite Love

Day Off

A man hanging out by the dumpsters below my window said
“That’s how they do it!”
right as I’m climaxing

It’s true, it’s a beautiful day

Then coffee then the museum

I can’t seem to scrub the mood off this funny little life,
like the sticker off something second hand

Found an actual pebble in my shoe
Perhaps I’ll keep it

Spoon in Wig

I’m looking at my spoon that has a smear of peanut butter cross the top
looking like a bit like a wig
a spoon in a wig

It’s important
right now
this little spoon has a wig on

It’s a mark of my character

When someone is left cold by these sorts of things, you see,
I want to punch them dead

bedtime

i can smell the heat off your body
you’re dreaming of your dead sister
so i wrap my leg around you like a seatbelt

so much night left to night

i’ll love you for my attire life
finfinitely

tomorrow we’ll enter into the weather
the rain will drip off your long eyebrow hairs
you’ll accuse me of watching you sleep
fair enough

disciples

i can’t help but worship devils
the inflammable, unfaithful, and private

and we, so humany
offering our magic because we don’t understand it

but they need us, and our parts
without us there’s no subject for spells
without us there’s just other devils

how terribly dull that would be

When it is over, you stitch me up, prettily

Brittany Dennison is a poet from St. Louis and Seattle, and currently lives in New York where she works at New Directions. She has poems forthcoming in The Literary Review, and has been published in A Dozen Nothing, Gramma, The West Wind Review, Abraham Lincoln, and Pacifica Literary Review.

About the Author

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