Introducing Electric Eel, A Newsletter About the Possibilities of Storytelling

A new weekly dispatch published by MCD x FSG and powered by Electric Literature

Starting today, Electric Literature is proud to announce Electric Eel, a newsletter about the possibilities of storytelling. Produced and edited by MCD x FSG and powered by Electric Literature, Electric Eel is a weekly look at the work of artists, activists, and organizations through the lens of storytelling. Sign up here to bless your inbox every Tuesday.

The first issue, which highlights Alexandra Bell’s “Counternarratives” project, describes the newsletter:

We’ll examine not what makes a good story — we are inundated with too many opinions about that already — but how a good story is told. Some of the best stories out there are being overlooked because they’re told by voices who have historically been underrepresented, or because we aren’t perceiving them as stories in the first place. We want to know: has anyone written the Great American Novel on Slack? How does a new book festival become an archive for its community? Is a high-concept restaurant in Los Angeles influenced by science fiction novels? What does it mean for an independent film studio to publish a zine?

If you enjoyed Electric Literature’s stories on the book that’s also a 20,000-square-foot bowling alley, the online story that uses football to illuminate humanity, the video game that shows us an alternate future for electronic books, or the plays that make you part of the story, Electric Eel is for you. If you’re interested in how we tell stories through visual art, through music, or through Twitter, sign up for a weekly peek at writers, artists, and innovators who are creating new possibilities of storytelling.

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Thank You!