This Instagram Bro Poet Will Make You Feel Much Better About Your Work

It’s a master class in who gets to be mediocre, and honestly sometimes we need that

Izzy Leslie, a writer and digital artist from Portland, gave us all a great gift yesterday when she drew attention to the work (we use that term lightly) of poet Collin Yost.

Leonard Brohen over here is extremely high on his own supply.

Okay, W.H. Broden!

To be fair to William Brotler Yeats, this one’s not bad. With a better picture it would have a real A Softer World feeling to it:

Overall, though, the saga of Brobert Frost is a master class in mediocrity: who notices it, who doesn’t, who gets to have it without consequence, and who is so inured to their own that they mistake it for depth. We probably don’t need to spell it out any further than that.

Responses to Edgar Allan Bro were mostly mocking:

But we think this one is probably the best way to react:

You keep on doing you, Charles Brokowski! Aspiring poets everywhere need an inoculation against impostor syndrome.

Incidentally, both Pabro Neruda and Leslie have come under fire for, respectively, writing gassed-up poems and noticing them. One of them handled it with a lot more grace than the other.

Why yes, Broyce Kilmer, we are actually poetry experts! And we say bless you. Bless you for the reminder that poetry is not some rarefied pantheon that only the anointed can enter. It’s just writing, and writing some more, and maybe posting what you write on Instagram next to a cigarette and getting shirty when someone doesn’t like it. Go forth, poets, and when you doubt yourself, look upon Collin Yost, and shine.

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