5 Winners and the Very Best of #LitWords

Earlier this week, Electric Literature ran a #LitWords contest to celebrate the release of Carson Mell’s Saguaro. We asked people to invent and define literature-inspired words, and suddenly Twitter was buzzing with the nerdiest of neologisms. Carson’s five favorites are featured below, and the creators will each receive a copy of Saguaro. The grand prize winner is also receiving an Electric Literature flask, for his creation of the word “profestory.”

And the winners are:

Profestory (n): A work so complex it can only be understood with explanation from someone who has spent years studying the story #LitWords

— Alexander Nader (@AlexNaderWrites) November 13, 2013

loliteral — adj. for someone who believes an author writing about pedophiles must be a pedophile himself #LitWords

— M. Nafpaktitis (@nafpaktitism) November 13, 2013

Vonnegutsy: having the fortitude to mix aspects of genre fiction with literary fiction. syn: Lethematic. #LitWords

— Michael Jones (@OtisBookJones) November 13, 2013

Warandpeace: n. unit of measurement for weighing books. “Don’t pack that copy. It weighs a warandpeace.” #litwords

— Cat York (@catyorkc) November 13, 2013

Pippish — adj, scared, confused, but ultimately hopeful #LitWords

— Brett Vogelsinger (@theVogelman) November 13, 2013

Congratulations to the winners!

Extra credit:
Looking for more literary neologisms? Here’s a compilation of other excellent submissions:

#LitWords

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